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and creative and fun programs to educate and nurture the community. she is also active with the full circle fund promoting the next generation of community leaders and driving lasting social change in the bay area. when she isn't running a business or helping her community, she spends time with her two daughters. so, with that i know that supervisor farrell would have loved to have honored you today, julia. thank you for your dedication and service to san francisco. (applause) >> thank you, supervisor tang, president chiu, the board of supervisors, and especially supervisor farrell's office, jeff, jack, margo, and catherine for hosting me today. i just wanted to say this is such an honor. i am in awe of the women first and foremost up here, hopefully one of our future mayors. and i'm in honor of the women who were honored today. i think that, you know, event bright is a place where we're passionate about life experiences. i think it's only natural that we would have been found and had we would build our company in san francisco which is so vibrant and so dense in talent and live experiences
with this amazing and inspiring group of women. thank you so much. i chose to apply my science and policy education towards sustainability. i have worked for more than 15 years in community forestry, conservation based development, water quality science, fixing national environmental programs and now working to harmonize to build a natural [speaker not understood] in san francisco and the bay area. i've been lucky to work with dedicated and really big hearted people. all of whom believe we can and should do more to reduce our ecological footprint and are working to figure out how. through my work today at spur and with friends of the urban forest, we're helping to move the city forward towards a more sustainable future where there are trees and sidewalk gardens everywhere, where we have zero carbon and an imminently [speaker not understood], not just preparing climate change, but doing everything we can to stop it. i have an [speaker not understood] policy science education and social responsibility and to get to do it here in san francisco where most people believe this is the right direction to b
's honoree is a teacher, and i think teachers make the world go round. and i think education is the great equalizer in our society. and as we talk about gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
in the republican party. withling to them educational choice and opportunity and small business. with the exception of nevada, the asian vote collapsed. now, michael targeting. e have heard from michael -- now, micro targeting. we have heard from michael barone. a friend of mine was handed an ipad and a clipboard before the election and was told, "this is the precinct you are going to walk." is onlysaid, "this four households." and they said, "that is ok. we have collins the messages -- , andve honed the messages we have decided that this is the script to appeal to those voters, and your job is to go out and get those, and nothing else. we will give you another precinct in the afternoon." she found them, and they were home, and she got the votes. that is micro targeting. ford, a former head of the council, he has said, of course, obama had a powerful message, but he was also able to find voters in places like colorado and florida that have not been found before, and we will have to emulate that if we want to have success. lastly, there is one thing we have to worry about. we are seeing an attempt t
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated. we want to lift people up from poverty, to put the american dream in reached for everybody. our party cannot hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climbed the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children we will champion school choice and solutions to lowering the cost of health care. instead of arithmetic our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. our 80 percent friend is not our 20 percent enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful of those who don't agree with a hundred percent of them. finding common ground with voters will be a top priority. so first, we're going to learn
education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing where some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a third is more substantial than it was a tenor 15 years ago. substantial is more than it was 10 or 15 years ago. rote to youto -- w about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved and in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? think it is indicative of the threat he mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in of the court proceeding . happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to china, ames or be happening at places?rd or other
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
. are yourdren responsibility. here in texas we are having to educate $10,000 per child per , and anyway, it is just absolutely ridiculous. all of this is because our government have absolutely refused to close the border all of these years. the country is really getting fed up with it. size,wn in texas of any they have a real organized mexican gang. drugs are coming in. are smugglingw in middle easterners and from all over the world. anyway, the government has cut back on enforcement should not cost americans $160 per day to detain someone. detain them long enough to get a bus to take them back. anti-illegal how immigration groups in arizona met the news last month that people from immigration detention centers were being let go. one phoenix-based group stands with arizona. executive director says that affirmative homeland security was using immigration security as a political weapon. he wrote the shocking, lawless merely to score points on sequestration proved we have said all along, they are far too politicized to be trusted to implement a good deal, or the gang of eight's immigration
and educate the people in pakistan? the administration has the power and ability to make it right. but this program is not reinstated, i'm going to introduce legislation to withhold nondefense foreign aid from pakistan until this wonderful program for our troops is fully funded. >> brian: he will introduce the bill in a few hours. we gave pakistan $12.7 million for education last year, a quarter of the tuition help needed for the marines. >> anna: in a stunning new report on mammograms, researchers saying 60% of abnormal mammograms turn out not to be cancer and they can lead to unnecessary surgery or biopsy. this is taking a serious mental toll on some patients. women who received a false positive report that they have anxiety and depression three years after learning that they're cancer free. >> steve: meanwhile, here is a story you'll be talk being all day. tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything that they read on the teleprompter, right? >> and we do have some breaking news to report to you. fox 54 has just learned that a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on liv
and women who served the best health care, the best educational opportunities, and the best job available. they deserve nothing less. it is my hope that this reckless and shortsighted decision will mark a turning point in american history and that that we will never again wage an unnecessary war. we must use all the tools of america's power in resolving disputes, including diplomacy. we must have sufficient congressional debate. we only debated this go to war resolution probably a couple hours. we need more debate and oversight before ever putting another u.s. soldier in harm's way. finally, mr. speaker, just like in iraq, there is no military solution in afghanistan. we need to bring the war in afghanistan to an accelerated end and to bring our troops home now. dr. martin luther king jr. in expressing his sentiment during a different war said, the bombs in vietnam exploded home. they destroy the hopes and possibilities of a decent america. let us put this decade of perpetual warfare behind us, invest in our veterans, our children, and get about the business of nation building here at hom
. new york educators have given the green light for a curriculum that contains picture books with realistic details of war. they include the librarian of basra which contains drawings of fighter planes dropping bombs on a palm tree lined middle eastern town and people wondering who will die. the lessons will be used in third through fifth grade. >>steve: wonder whose idea that is? >>ainsley: not mine. >>steve: 25 minutes before the top of the hour. we were talking about the bracket. he's our bracketeer, mr. kilmeade. >>brian: let's talk basketball. louisville scoring the top seed tournament last night. other top seeds: kansas in the south, gonzaga in the west and indiana in the east. kentucky failing to make the tournament. they are stunned. tempers flaring after denny hamlin hits his former teammate, spinning him around. begano racing over to hamlin. the two had to be pulled apart. then they went to a twitter war. they are really mad at each other and called each other out. and now the two bushes finishing the top five. coming up between 9 and noon between kilmeade and frie
please, please educate yourself, educate your family, go out and get tested. and that's what the name of the game is. go out and get tested. >> joy, the stats on minority communities and how just wildly disproportie porgportionately t affected by this. getting tested is is a huge part of the puzzle. but also so is getting treatment. we've been talking about obama care and what it does, it extends preventive services, free ones to 71 million americans and yet this weekend, there's a concerted effort to unwind obama care. not through broad strokes, but the republican strategy at this point seems to be death by 1,000 cuts, unwinding funding, doing things to make it more difficult to extend the insurance exchange. when in reality. this is still an epidemic in the black community, still an epidemic, globally as well. no one is speaking out for the good things that obama care is doing and the very important services it's extending to minority communities and nonminority communities. >> to say nothing of governors who are rejecting the medicaid expansion. which is the only way people got hea
school children in new york. educators have given a green light to english curriculum that includes picture books with realistic portrayals of war for 8-year-olds. one contains fighter planes dropping bombs on a middle eastern town. another depicts an abduction of a young man from his home. it will be used in the third through 5th grade. >> a colorado sheriff taking a stand against two aggressive new gun control managers. john cook says he won't enforce expanded background checks on firearms purchases or a 15 round limit on ammunition magazines. criminals are still going to get their guns. democratic governor is expected to sign the measures into law. >>> an oregon girl is being hailed as a hero saving her family from a fire. the 7-year-old says she woke up in the house filled with smoke. she woke up her brother, her father and his girlfriend. >> i opened the door i and i cannot see. >> it was kind of surreal. walked out and freaking out inside trying to stay cool on the outside. get everybody out of the house. >> where the drier used to be so hot it milted t-- melted the sink. >> f
in pakistan and got attention as she pushed for education rights for girls. she has a reason to celebrate in her new home. >> paula faris behind the wheel, learning firsthand about driving distracted when her kids are demanding her attention from the back seat. the safety lessons she learned that could happy any parent. >>> first the historic visit by president obama to israel. the first time mr. obama visited the jewish state in his presidency. he will be greeted in tel aviv by top israeli leaders and then whisked to high-level meetings. >> the trip is expected to be rich in symbolism, and a speech by the president to israeli people to pledge friendship and security. >> with the mideast in turmoil and because of so much uncertainty in the region the trip is a high profile one. >> alex marquardt is in jerusalem. where the president meets with prime minister netanyahu today. alex, good morning, the trip we hear so much about symbolism is that code for not a lot of substance. break it down for us. >> reporter: good morning, yeah, i think you are absolutely right. the trip
trip, your education, bank account, car, house, et cetera aonly serve on goal, fulfill your main mission. develop ties in policy making circles in in the u.s. and send intelligence reports to center. they took numerous surveillance photos with other russian spies and recorded this video of a federal russian living near washington, d.c. under the name michael zatoli. the murphies zatoli and others lived across the united states. they pursued academic degrees and held jobs in banking in telecom. donald heath field and tracy leeann foley even groomed their son to become a spy. >> we say long-term it is 30 years, it's get your second generation into the united states. >> coming up... >> local montclair police cars and fbi agents coming in and out of their house. it was just a shshshshshshsh >> you are my wife. >> in the television series "the americans" keri russell and matthew reese play russian spies living under deep cover as a suburban couple. the series was inspired the fbi's ghost stories which revealed a russian spy ring here in america. >> one of the things we looked for in t
the fact that the democratic budget invests in people and when you invest in people an jobs and education -- ms. slaughter: i yield the gentlelady an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jackson lee: when off preschool program, when you have programs that transition women out of their homes after raising children into jobs, when off program that allows young people with a college degree to get a job, when you have programs that invest in infrastructure and build highways and bridges that america is begging for, like we built the hoover dam, then our grandchildren and children will receive an america that we invested in, they'll receive a fwift and they'll be able to work with their hands and their minds and they will have the ability to pay down any debt, they'll close any deficit, and they'll be grateful to do it because america will be the greatest nation that it condition. don't constantly pound us with our grandchildren and our children. right now, today, america can afford to pay for what we are doing in the van hollen democratic budget becaus
a hoveround can take you! >>> believe it or not, you want to educate yourself about business you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly, the fabulous board game that i used to win at almost all of the time as a kid mostly because my family didn't want to deal with me being a sore loser. confidentially, i did like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost! >> wow! >> so i don't blame them for letting me win. you remember how monopoly works, right? when someone lands on the space they owe you 25 smackers monopoly money, but -- oh, it's chinese money. it's probably worth a fortune, but if you own all four railroads and if you have a monopoly on the rail business in this imaginary world, and another player lands on them, then you have to pay the guy $200. that's a fortune, right? that's a fortune. what the heck does this have to do with the real world or the real stock market? simple. it teaches us that as companies have more market share and less competition they can make their customers pay them a heck of a lot more money like the railroads. a monopoly is a wonderf
and educational. but it's a great show. >> i could go on. we have to leave it there. because let's talk health insurance. this is something that got all of us talking this morning. give us personal medical information or pay hundreds of dollars. this is the message from cvs to its employees now. is it an invasion of privacy, is it fair business practice? we'll weigh in on that next. [ together ] i had a break-in. we were out when it happened. by the time we called the police, there wasn't much they could do. i felt so helpless. we were out when it happened, but adt quickly called the police. i felt like it was over right away. feels like it's still not over. we lost our digital photos, financial records -- things that insurance simply can't replace. [ male announcer ] you can't predict when bad things will happen, but you can help protect yourself with the fast alarm response of adt. we're always there for your family. with more monitoring centers, more ways to keep up with life at home, and 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide, starting at just over $1 a
to take the federal government out of the education and toss out a few grants to states to handle everything from medicaid to infrastructure. brown is also a member of the republican study committee, a group of house conservatives proposing a more aggressive alternative to the ryan plan and promising to balance the budget in just four years. the op-ed comes just a day after the rnc's autopsy report. yet that, too, is getting attacked from the right for not sticking to so-called conservative ideals. >> the republicans are just totally bamboozled right now and they are entirely lacking in confidence. they think they got landslided and they didn't. the republican party lost because it's not conservative. it didn't get its base up. >> i'd say it's always great to see rush limbaugh making illusions to spike lee's malcolm x. let's bring in ryan grim -- and democratic strategist chris k i kofinas. the budget proposal, how bad is it when ryan's proposal is considered not radical enough? are we in pretty bad shape? >> i don't know where they think they're going with this. coming out and s
. she was shot because she was outspoken about equal education rights for women. ainsley? >> thanks, patti ann. >> top taxpayers already seeing a recent hike in the latest income tax. they have a new reason to blow their lids now. a $120 million retro active tax grab is hitting small business owners. we have the story. >> after determining in december a decade's old tax break is no longer there they are tack that enter reas entrepreneurs who claimed the break over the years. the business owners aren't too happy about that. >> how would you feel you made a decision four years ago you knew was legally correct and four years later a governing body came in and said it's not correct now you owe us a bunch more money and we are going to charge you interest on money that you didn't even know you owed. >> that was brian over street who had research system last year. they paid their taxes based on the law at the time. but the state appeals court ruled the tax break provision requiring companies maintain 80 percent of the work force in california was unconstitutional. the state franchise tax
, especially with education, but there's always the bush name. that's good and bad, but they've been a bush in the white house forever, there's a lot of people that don't remember a republican president but george bush. >> that may not be a positive. thank you, chip. you can't bring your brother to the convention with you, you have problems. thank you, mr. mayor for coming on again. >>> up next, the president is in the middle east. he seems to be winning over many skeptical israelis especially the young who are not skeptical. that could be good things for the president. don't you think? this is a big, positive trip for him. this is "hardball," the place for politics. g, waiting... feel like you're growing older... waiting to look younger? don't wait. [ female announcer ] get younger looking skin fast. with new olay regenerist micro-sculpting cream. the next generation with 2 new anti-aging ingredients. it penetrates rapidly. visible wrinkle results start day 1. and you'll see younger looking skin before you even finish one jar. ♪ new olay regenerist. the wait is over. >>> well, could 2013
not only to help but also educate those people in the local flood plains who are living in flood plains about what risk is there. we build storm risk reduction projects but we call them reduction not protection projects because you are not totally protected. it's an opportunity for us to educate people as to what it is we should be looking to the future. we are looking to our planning process within the army corp of engineers. and looking at future projects because that's a reality and we need to be able to adapt now to what it is we can anticipate in the future. i think in your planning in doing that is a way for us to be able to anticipate and also hopefully be able to have some risk reduction in future disasters. >> thank you very much for that. i'm going to give a very short closing statement of my own looking back on the last couple of hours and what we've heard and said here. something you said ten or 15 minutes ago, in each disaster we learn something new. and i used to say to my sons there is nothing wrong with making mistakes. we all make mistakes. i am the only democrat around
% of mothers were feeding solid foods at a month and six months that went high as 90%. moms need to be educated when to know their child is ready. one of the ways you know your child tells you. heather: that is what you mentioned putting their hands in their mouth. >> and chewing. making motions that tell you they're ready to go. heather: you know moms that choose it use formula, it can get competent sensitive. -- expensive. another reason it is a economic factor to start child on solid food earlier. >> between four and six months the child is consuming a lot of formula. we need to find better ways for mom with difficulty, have not been educated who may not beable able to afford formula, get the formula at less expensive prices so they can be doing the right thing for their baby. >> the bottom line, it is a real danger to the baby to start them on solid food prior it six months? >> it it is significant risk on both sides in terms of development of the giving them something they can't digest and lack the enzymes and bacteria in their gut that allow them to consume the foods. we're also creating
of law, economic development, education, and health. we consider these to be investments in a future palestinian state. investments in peace, which is in all of our interests. more broadly, in our discussions today i reaffirmed to president apass that the united states remains committed to realizing the vision of two states, which is in the interest of the palestinian people and also in the national security interest of israel, the united states and the world. we seek an independent, viable and contiguous palestinian state as the home land of the palestinian people, alongside the jewish state of israel, two nations enjoying self-determination, security, and peace. as i've said many times, the only way to achieve that goal is through direct negotiations between israelis and palestinians themselves. there is no short cut to a sustainable solution. in our discussion with president abbas, i heard him speak out about the difficult issues that cannot be ignored. among them, problems caused by continued settlement activity, the plight of palestinian prisoners, and access to holy sites in j
the constitution, myself. i'm reasonably well educated. and i thank you for the lecture. >> well, there you have it. this is the face of the new republican right. they basically are for everyone having a gun whenever they want it. in fact, they encourage you have to a gun. >> they have no shame, to go back to the mccarthy period. and i think senator cruz is one of those individuals. i mean, i think he'll demagogue this issue and it plays well for his constituency. and he -- you know, i think he might even believe some of this. >> let's take a look at the numbers here. you're familiar with this this. this is different between passion and effective politics. the people with passion on this issue tend to be the gun people. look at these numbers, though. if you look at the whole country, now. armed guards in schools, pretty close. what do you think of that 50%, 48%? >> it's an easy solution people think about. there are a lot of schools that have police officers. >> you don't have a big -- i don't either. what about this assault weapons ban? it's just about 57%, 3 out of 5. not a strong endorsement. >>
defense education loans i was in the peace corps, changed my lives. my father worked for the city of philadelphia. i have no problem with public service. that's where i'm at. that's how i got here. your party says that's degraded. i got a 47% because my father is on a g.i. bill and ended up on social security. what's wrong with government? >> look it -- >> good for most people. am i addicted to government? >> first of all, as a country, particularly to washington they're addicted to spending. we created this massive point -- >> you're on there. that's your winning -- you got the win card right there. >> manufacturing, obama says those jobs are gone forever. >> he does not say that, actually. >> when did he say that? >> president obama did not say that. >> we've got to admit those jobs are gone. >> no. >> some. >> he worked hard to bring back manufacturing. >> perhaps most typical -- let's get back to our report. reince priebus, it's about communication but the party never tried to stop to distant franchise, mainly poor african-american voters since the last election. stricter phot
like feeding programs in ethiopia and agriculture education in afghanistan. and he records it all through the lens of his own camera. >> you all of a sudden begin to kind of look around, and you notice there's a lot of people around that don't look too good. and, you know, they're hungry. and they don't have great living quarters. they may not have access to water. they don't have good sanitation. >> you were seeing farmers who couldn't feed themselves? >> oh, absolutely. i looked at that, and i thought, "you know, this is wrong. i understand agriculture. i should be able to do something about this." [ticking] >> coming up: the challenges of philanthropy. >> you know bill gates. have you said to him, "80% of what you're throwing down there in africa is not gonna work"? >> well, i've said it a little differently, i think, and that is that we need to quit thinking about trying to do it like we do it in america. >> the buffetts and bill gates when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. it's a new day. if your a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm tr
for education, for the udget, for taxes, etc. guest: what i hear from hispanics who live close to the border is wait, we came here legally for eight years we did everything the right way -- one woman worked for me in the office for years and said this is a dangerous path you're on. she is legal and for 150 is going to work a lot of lawyers do for $5,000. she said you can't put people here who are not following the law ahead of people who are doing things the right way. so they are divided with this. host: so what is important to them? guest: it's a very broad range of opinions, but many just want the law to be followed. they have got family members, maybe an you think or aunt or sister waiting in their home country and the process is sometimes 18-20 years with congressional help, so they are saying what we really need to do is reform legal immigration to where we could get an answer within a year. i was recently with that group and know there were people who were either friends or here without documentation. i just put out a question, how many of you here know somebody without papers? and al
in this country who has not used the american taxpayer dollars to get their education. a friend of mine was refused service. somebody will have to explain that to me. i don't understand it. thank you. host: we have got more on the affordable care act. this is some analysis from the urban institute, and they write -- third, the new law will not affect most firms -- new york is on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: hi. yeah, i am calling listening to everybody who has called. it is really very upsetting, this entire thing. people in this country need help. everybody knows it, and the reason i am calling is president obama at some point has said that what we ought to do is give doctors the money, extra healthfor preventive care. you go into a doctor's office nowadays, and the first thing he does is give you a pill. a lot of people, they will give you samples. a lot of of people don't know, but these doctors get money for pressuring certain pills. and i think that is absolutely wrong. evidently, it is not illegal. i think somebody ought to look into that, because it would bring d
customer. >> that's the absolutely right thing to do. a lack of education is terrible and doesn't bode well for a great financial future. >> alisyn: by the time they're ten years old. it's time to talk about interest, loan, time horizon and inflation, and taxes. what is that? >> now we're getting the bigger words here, alisyn. interest, the money that you paid for them. anybody lending you money, the loan when you borrow money for things like a car and teenagers may need a loan if they're getting close to those times and inflation, just that things get more costly over time and you have to, obviously, account for that in taxes and we're all familiar with those. >> alisyn: so you're explaining all this have to your ten-year-old, even if it's not applicable to their life yet. you're telling them what's on the horizon. >> exactly. >> alisyn: let's talk about 15 years old and this is where i think things get serious and you have the baby-sitting money and you have some stuff that you want to buy. so, you say investing, allocation asset. diversification, stock funds. >> i'm so happy we're doing
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